The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership
The Johnson Partnership
The Johnson Partnership
The Johnson Partnership
The Johnson Partnership1212 NE 65th St., Seattle, WA 98115  206-523-1618

In the Works…

October 20, 2017 10:04 am

The Maple Creek deck is making steady progress

The action continues with the construction of the cantilevered deck: the floor joists have been installed and the decking boards are next. As the railings are fabricated the exterior modifications will be completed and siding installed. The scaffolding will remain up until the very end of this project as the underside will be some 30 feet above grade… difficult to reach with a paintbrush!

The steel 'C' Chanel beams receive a 2x_ until to give them an appearance to the original wood deck framing.

Boards prop up the steel C-channel beams to give them the appearance of the original wood deck framing. The board is attached from behind to conceal the fasteners.

The deck joists are doubled to replicate the original design and match the small balcony and entry walk.

The deck joists are doubled to replicate the original design and match the small balcony and entry walk.

The steel diagonal strut connection to the beam supporting the deck joists

The steel diagonal strut connects to the beam supporting the deck joists.

October 16, 2017 2:55 pm

Villa Luna in print and on newsstands!

Fine Homebuilding magazine has just released its 2017 Kitchens & Bathrooms edition, and we are proud to have one of our projects featured in this issue! Villa Luna was a multi-phase project that included a major update of the master bath. Purchase a copy of the magazine or get digital access to it here. Villa Luna is featured on pp. 72-73.

You can read more about the development of Villa Luna here and here.

This is the second year in a row that one of our projects has appeared in the FHB Kitchen & Bath issue!

October 5, 2017 10:39 am

Beautiful Craftsmanship

More progress to report on the Tudor-style beauty on Capitol Hill whose porch roof had fallen into disrepair. As the project nears completion, one can see the craftsmanship on full display, before being covered with paint. With fir beams, copper flashing, and new roofing with proper overflow scuppers, this roof will last.

The custom shaped beam ends all have copper cap flashing to protect the wood.

The custom-shaped beam ends all have copper cap flashing to protect the wood.

This concrete cap replaces the failed caps on the north porch of the house. After an acid wash and a little aging it will look like the original.

A concrete cap replaces the failed caps on the northern porch of the house. After an acid wash and a little aging it will look like the original.

Torch down roofing with proper slope to the drain. The roofing is continuous up and over the top of the parapet wall.

Here we see the method known as “torch down” roofing, with proper slope to the drain. The roofing is continuous up and over the top of the parapet wall.

September 26, 2017 3:04 pm

Travel to the Northeast

Ellen recently enjoyed a family vacation on the east coast, and took the opportunity to learn more about the history and architecture of New Jersey and New York.

Courtesy of the Chester Historical Society

Interior of the Cooper Gristmill

First stop was the Cooper Gristmill in Chester, New Jersey. Built in 1826, the restored building is one of the only extant water-powered mills in the state. A volunteer demonstrated the mill’s interior workings, including the massive water wheel.

Next stop was Waterloo Village in New Jersey. Built as a canal village, it is now a protected historical park, with a working smithy, a gristmill, and other interpretive centers that illustrate daily life in 1872.

The Finger Lakes region of New York was next, with two particularly interesting sites. The first was the Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion in Canandaigua. The house was the country home of wealthy banker Frederick Ferris Thompson and his wife, Mary Clark Thompson. It was designed by prominent New York City architect Francis Richmond Allen. Even more famous than the house are the restored gardens, which were designed by landscape architect Ernest W. Bowditch.

The second site in the Finger Lakes area was the Seneca Bark Longhouse and Seneca Art & Cultural Center in Ganondagan, two sites that form an interpreted landscape exploring the culture and history of the Seneca and Haudenosaunee peoples and the village of Ganondagan. The longhouse has been faithfully reproduced from archaeological evidence dating back to the seventeenth century. The Seneca Art & Cultural Center opened in 2015 with an award-winning design by Francois de Menil in conjunction with DeWolff Partnership architects.

Canal workers’ housing, Waterloo Village, New Jersey (soon to be restored)

Smithy at Waterloo Village, New Jersey

Mill at Waterloo Village, New Jersey

Waterloo Village, New Jersey

Sonnenberg Mansion, Canandaigua, New York

Sonnenberg Italian garden, Canandaigua, New York

Seneca Bark Longhouse, Ganondagan, New York

Seneca Art & Cultural Center at Ganondagan. Designed by Francois de Menil, AIA, in conjunction with DeWolff Partnership Architects, 2015.

September 19, 2017 10:44 am

A kitchen remodel nears completion

This kitchen remodel in Normandy Park is almost done, with nearly all the comforts of home. The floor is finished, the lighting and appliances are being set, and the island countertop has been installed. The new countertop is heated, creating the perfect spot to read the newspaper on chilly winter mornings.

Countertops installed

Countertops installed

September 15, 2017 11:44 am

The Locks: “Seattle’s Waterway to the World”

Last weekend Larry and Lani enjoyed a beautiful, sunny day at the Locks, and attended the premiere of the documentary “Seattle’s Waterway to the World,” exploring the history and legacy of the Locks. The movie was made by local filmmaker Vaun Raymond, who also put together and shared a short “making-of” feature for this event. Larry contributed to the making of the movie, taking Vaun out on his boat Meander to get footage of the canal. (The film includes a cameo shot of Larry piloting Meander!) Many of the other attendees at the screening had worked on the project in one way or another; Vaun had them all stand for a group photo and to acknowledge their contributions.

“Seattle’s Waterway to the World” is one of a series of films celebrating the centennial of the Lake Washington Ship Canal. You can watch these films and delve into a trove of additional historic resources at Making the Cut. Particularly recommended is the film titled “A Glass Half Full: Native Americans & the Shipping Canal,” exploring a little-known side of the waterway’s history.

Larry (third from left) and other contributors to “Seattle’s Waterway to the World.”

 

 

September 12, 2017 7:56 am

Stewardship and repair of a Tudor-style house

We have been assisting longstanding clients for many years with the stewardship of their beautiful Tudor-style home. This summer the porch roof on the patio needed replacing, due to age and poor detailing.

With the help of Saltaire Construction, the failing portions were carefully removed, and reconstruction has begun. We are in the process of replacing structural elements and building an entire new roof. The details will all match the original work, but with updated materials and methods of construction, including upgrading the waterproofing, so this roof can last well into the future.

The previous beam was only attached to the house with four nails and lacked proper flashing.

The previous beam was only attached to the house with four nails and lacked proper flashing.

The beams spanned to a brick column. You can see there the unfleshed roof allowed water to rot the beams to the point where they were falling out.

The beams attached to a brick column. You can see here that the unflashed roof allowed water to rot the beams to the point where they were falling out.

The power to the light fixture will be concealed as the beam will be exposed on the ceiling.

The power source for the light fixture will need to be concealed, as the beam will be exposed at the ceiling.

Where the beams meet the columns the they have been preprinted and cited to protect against water intrusion.

The beams, where they meet the columns, have been pre-primed and coated to protect against water intrusion.

The rafter ends are all cut to match the profile of the original refer ends.

The rafter ends are cut to match the profile of the originals.

The new cedar rafters are being installed in the same layout as the original roof.

The new cedar rafters are being installed in the same layout as the original roof.

September 7, 2017 11:21 am

New documentary about the Locks, at the Locks

A Japanese freighter passes through the Ballard Locks towards Puget Sound, 1921. Image: University of Washington Libraries, Asahel Curtis Collection

This Sunday, September 10th, the Army Corps of Engineers is hosting the public premiere of “Seattle’s Waterway to the World,” a documentary by local filmmaker Vaun Raymond about the history and legacy of the Hiram M. Chittenden locks. This is one in a series of films by Raymond called “The Legacy of the Locks and Lake Washington Ship Canal,” which itself is part of Making the Cut, a coalition of organizations and individuals commemorating the Ship Canal for its centennial.

The 60-minute film will be shown at the Ballard Locks Visitor Center at 1:30 pm. The program will also include a behind the scenes featurette about the making of the “Legacy of the Locks” series, hosted by the filmmaker himself.

Firm principal Larry Johnson consulted with Raymond on the film. Maritime history is part of the historic resources and stewardship services we offer, and you can read about several of our maritime projects here, here, and here.

More information about Making the Cut and the centennial events can be found here.

A listing of all events at the Locks can be found here.

 

September 6, 2017 2:29 pm

Ranger Doug’s World Headquarters Grand Opening Celebration

Ranger Doug’s Enterprises is a graphic production company that reproduces National Parks posters from the Works Progress Administration era, and designs new posters for parks in that same style. We recently helped them update a basic warehouse in Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood. Last week company founder Doug Leen and his team hosted an open house to celebrate the opening of their new world headquarters!

The WPA funded thousands of writers, musicians, and visual artists under the aegis of the Federal Arts Project. The “Fed One,” as it was known, included a poster division that produced more than 2 million posters from 35,000 original designs. The National Park poster program began in 1938, producing designs for 14 parks before being shuttered by the onset of World War II. Because posters were considered ephemera and commonly printed on cheap paper, only approximately 2,000 prints from an estimated 2 million WPA posters remain.

Doug Leen served as a seasonal ranger at Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming; in 1971 he discovered a tattered poster for the park in a pile of rubbish–a small event that lead to a twenty-year search for additional designs in the National Park series. Since founding Ranger Doug Enterprises in 1993, Doug and co-artist Brian Maebius have created more than 40 original designs for parks in the style of the original WPA posters.

Today the company sells the original and new designs as posters, postcards, and stickers, which you can browse and purchase here: rangerdoug.com

Here Ranger Doug himself gives a tour of the new shipping and receiving area of the warehouse - nicely organized!

Here Ranger Doug himself gives a tour of the new shipping and receiving area of the warehouse – nicely organized!

The 'Wall of Color' displayed all the posters the make along with some photographs of Ranger Doug's latest road trip across America.

The “Wall of Color” displayed all the posters they make along with some photographs of Ranger Doug’s latest road trip across America.

Ellen Mirro joined in the party and had a tour of the airstream with custom interior.

Our colleague Ellen Mirro joined the party and had a tour of Doug’s much-traveled Airstream trailer with custom interior.

 

 

 

 

September 1, 2017 2:24 pm

Maple Creek steel installation continues

If you’ve been following the progress on the cantilevered deck in Maple Creek, you know that one challenge has been to securely anchor the steel beams on the steep slope. Terry Bocian at Houseworks Construction has been using all of his ingenuity in order to insert the steel members into the existing wood framed structure without disturbing the interior finishes. A huge shout-out to Houseworks for figuring out this complicated construction. http://www.houseworkscc.com

The whole office made a field trip to observe the steel being lifted by a crane. This is Howard Miller on the scaffolding.

Ellen Mirro, the project architect, standing on the scaffolding with one of the steel beams that will cantilever over the ravine.

 


 

 

A view of the height of the scaffolding, as seen from the ravine.