The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership The Johnson Partnership
The Johnson Partnership
The Johnson Partnership
The Johnson Partnership
The Johnson Partnership1212 NE 65th St., Seattle, WA 98115  206-523-1618

In the Works…

Archive for the ·

Uncategorized

· Category...

February 21, 2017 2:29 pm

Moving a big tree next week!

This will be exciting and we’ll do a follow-up post afterwards. Behind our office, we have a small garden with a lovely 25-foot Stewartia tree near the back property line. Stewart’s are known for their camellia like flowers, glossy leaves and distinctive bark.

A seven-story development will be starting soon on the adjacent property to the north, and unfortunately this means that the Stewartia tree would be destroyed by construction. But, why waste a healthy specimen tree when you can move it!

Lani contacted Seattle Parks and found they they had three locations where such a tree was wanted, and she arranged with Big Trees, Inc. to have our tree moved on the morning of February 28. It will be moved to the Washington Park Arboretum and replanted on the same day around 11:00-11:30 AM, right at the entrance to Azalea Way, across the driveway from the Graham Visitor Center. You can even watch the cool Big Tree equipment and tree-moving process there!

Below is a link to the company that will be moving the tree.

Moving Trees Offsite

December 19, 2016 12:41 pm

Happy Holidays from TJP

From all of us at the Johnson Partnership, we wish you and yours a warm and festive holiday season!

tjp-staff-dinner-2016

November 21, 2016 2:42 pm

Keep your eyes open

to see one of our projects featured in the Pacific Northwest Magazine supplement in the Seattle Times, this Sunday Nov. 27th!
times-mastheadscreen-shot-2016-11-21-at-2-13-50-pm

August 11, 2016 4:01 pm

Foundation poured, next the concrete roof

The exterior walls of this below grade addition have been completed. The concrete roof gets poured next.

Preparing to frame the forms for the roof.

Preparing to frame the forms for the roof.

The opening to the basement of the existing house.

The opening to the basement of the existing house.

July 13, 2016 3:02 pm

Excavation complete

and the footings have been poured. Next the walls will be formed and poured. The floor slabs will be poured last to facilitate the installation of the various utilities that get installed under the slabs.

Discussing the progress.

Discussing the progress.

Water proofing applied.

Water proofing applied.

Steel beams installed now that the basement floor has been lowered.

Steel beams installed now that the basement floor has been lowered.

May 17, 2016 4:36 pm

A new home is making progress on Whidbey Island

Painting and wall board are under way for this home. The solar array is fully functional!

(Thanks to the owner for the photos.)

From the southwest the solar array on the garage roof can be seen on the right.

From the southwest the solar array on the garage roof can be seen on the right.

From the west you get a real sense of the spacial hierarchy.

From the west you get a real sense of the spacial hierarchy.

May 9, 2016 10:24 am

Burke Addition and Remodel Nears Completion

All the finishes and trim elements are being installed, the painters have taken over the job site and the owners are excited to move back into their home.

The original mantle remains with a new tile surround and hearth and gas insert. The tile will be grouted this week.

The original mantel remains with a new tile surround and hearth and gas insert. The tile will be grouted this week.

Their son's room has blue walls with a dramatic dark blue ceiling.

The client’s son’s room has blue walls with a dramatic dark blue ceiling.

The kid's bathroom has a classic glazed white tile laid vertically with a blue glass vertical 'waterfall' accent.

The kids’ bathroom has a classic glazed white tile, laid vertically with a blue glass vertical ‘waterfall’ accent.

April 21, 2016 11:42 am

Happy Earth Day!

“The greenest building is one that is already built.” –Carl Elefante

IMG_8095

Preserving buildings–and using them–is the best way to put into practice the environmentalist credo “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.” At The Johnson Partnership, we believe in using our historic buildings for the way we live now, and building new structures that will last into the next century. We use our LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) credentials to inform our everyday architectural practice in our quest to be responsible to the earth.

View our historic stewardship portfolio here: www.tjp.us/arch/portfolio.php?page=Stewardship

For further reading about sustainability and historic preservation try the following links:

www.nps.gov/tps/sustainability.htm

www.preservationnation.org/information-center/sustainable-communities/green-lab/valuing-building-reuse.html

www.wbdg.org/resources/sustainable_hp.php

 

Since its founding in 1970, Earth Day has grown into one of the biggest secular holidays in the world, celebrated in more than 190 countries. Whether you take a global or local view of the occasion, we wish you–and the planet–a beautiful Earth Day.

April 18, 2016 1:47 pm

Tour of Denny Hall

IMG_4917

Denny Hall, the University of Washington’s oldest building, is currently closed for extensive renovation, but this weekend our staff were fortunate to have a tour of the building. The University has been renovating and restoring the exterior, and creating a new interior that reflects the original central stair plan, while updating the building for modern university requirements.

IMG_4089

Denny Hall was the first building built on the campus after the University was relocated from its original location at Fourth Avenue and University Street in downtown Seattle. The hall corresponds to many other colleges’ and universities’ “Old Main” as it originally housed classrooms, laboratories, a 736-seat auditorium, a library, and administrative offices. The building was constructed of coursed split-faced Tenino sandstone and styled in the French Renaissance style, recalling a sixteenth century French Chateau. Originally known as the Administration Building, it was renamed in 1910 by the Board of Regents in honor of early Seattle pioneers Arthur A. and Mary Denny.

The iconic southern façade features an entrance porch with three shallow Romanesque arches with three second-story windows above and a triple gabled dormer projecting from the hip roof. Round towers with steep conical roofs flank the entry. A relatively small central cupola built by master craftsman Gottlieb Weibell crowns the roof and houses the University’s 1862 Varsity Bell, now rung only during Homecoming weekend.

IMG_4087

 

In 1894 the University of Washington commissioned Charles Willard Saunders to design their first building on the new Montlake campus: the Main Building (1894-95, Administration Building, now Denny Hall, altered). Stone left over from the construction of the Main Building was used to construct the second permanent building on campus, the Observatory. Saunders also designed the University’s first Gymnasium/Amory (1894-95, demolished) and the Bell Tower (1904, destroyed 1949).

IMG_4088

IMG_4925IMG_4984

March 18, 2016 11:59 am

Light & Wood

To celebrate our colleague Howard’s birthday this Wednesday, we took a company-wide jaunt across the lake to visit the Bellevue Arts Museum. There we discovered “Night Blooming,” a structure made of reclaimed wood  from dismantled grain elevators from Eastern Washington. From the outside the piece resembles a giant bee skep; within the structure the gaps between the wooden pieces let in sharp points of light, creating a kaleidoscopic effect. “Night Blooming” was created by Taiji Miyasaka and David Drake, both of Washington State University.

IMG_4581 BAM2