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May 23, 2017 10:00 am

AIA National Conference on Architecture

At the end of April, our colleague Howard Miller attended the 2017 AIA Conference on Architecture in Orlando. This was a great opportunity to learn about the latest trends and technology and the ways architecture is contributing to the wellbeing of communities in the United States and around the world. The program included speakers from Africa addressing the life-changing effect of architecture on small communities when priority is given to working with locals and using local materials. Keynote speaker Michelle Obama inspired us to listen and be inclusive rather than discriminatory. On the convention floor, one of the standout products was Flowstone, a translucent calcite stone that can be glazed and used on kitchen counters, table tops, spa surfaces, and more. On display were also innovative updates to windows, design software, and home automation. Offsite activities included a bicycle tour of Orlando, highlighting the progress the city has made towards being more bike-friendly. Overall it was a great convention. Next year it will be in New York City!

Convention over, time to clean up.

Convention over, time to clean up.

Jim Belushi concert

Jim Belushi concert

Orlando's brutalist library

The Brutalist Orlando Public Library, designed in 1966 by John Johansen.

The City symbol is a fountain in a lake. Lots of lakes in Orlando.

Orlando is full of lakes, and the fountain rising from Lake Eola (shown here) is the symbol of the city.

An architectural bicycle tour is a nice way to get around. Orlando's bicycle infrastructure is not to Seattle's level, but they are progressing.

An architectural bicycle tour is a nice way to get around. Orlando’s bicycle infrastructure is not at Seattle’s level, but they are progressing.

Michele Obama made he first public speaking appearance since leaving the White House at the convention. Inspiring.

Michelle Obama’s first public speaking appearance since leaving the White House was at the convention. Inspiring.

Orlandos new cultural building.

Orlando’s new cultural building: the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts

The line waiting for Michele Obama.

The line waiting to see Michelle Obama speak.

A little Fake History that has become iconic none the less.

A little Fake History that has become iconic nonetheless.

June 17, 2011 2:52 pm

Vieux Carré (French Quarter)

More snapshots from our visit to New Orleans during the AIA convention, this time of Vieux Carré, also known as the French Quarter. The French Quarter is the oldest neighborhood in New Orleans and is one of about twenty National Historic Districts in this amazing city. The French Quarter is one of America’s highly distinctive historic neighborhoods, and it certainly remains vibrant today

It is interesting to note than many of the buildings in the French Quarter were built before New Orleans became part of the United States in 1803, as part of the Louisiana Purchase. The colonial French settlement was established in 1718 by the French Mississippi Company, lead by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville. In 1788, a great fire destroyed most of the original French colonial buildings, and most of the extant 18th century buildings in the French Quarter were built after this fire, during a period of Spanish rule (1763 to 1801). Thus, many French Quarter buildings may show Spanish influences. New Orleans briefly was returned to French rule from 1801 to 1803.

The French Quarter’s rich architectural heritage also includes buildings by Benjamin-Henry Latrobe, who is considered America’s first formally-trained, professional architect. Latrobe and his son both worked on projects in the French Quarter between about 1807 and 1820. Buildings by the elder Latrobe around the French Quarter include the New Orleans Customs House (1807) and the central tower of St. Louis Cathedral.

The French Quarter is famous for its restaurants and lively nightlife, as well as its historic architecture. Actually, the Quarter seems lively 24 hours a day, and is wonderfully fun to visit!

Check back week after next for another post on New Orleans.

Royal Street

 

Colorful shops and residences in the French Quarter

 

Evening street scene from Arnaud's restaurant balcony

 

Off-hours interior view of Arnaud's, one the district's historic fine dining establishments

 

Bourbon Street on a weeknight

 

 

Residence along Esplanade Avenue, along the edge of the French Quarter

Sunny morning in Jackson Square, looking toward statue of Andrew Jackson. St. Louis cathedral, shown in my first 2011 New Orleans post, fronts onto Jackson Square

May 27, 2011 3:26 pm

AIA National Convention in New Orleans

Larry and Lani attended the AIA convention in New Orleans in May. Excellent keynote speaker, lots of seminars and learning events, and a great opportunity to visit one of our country’s cultural treasures. New Orleans is amazing! I’ll post more pictures in upcoming blog posts and share some of highlights of our architectural touring—watch for future posts.

Jackson Square, New Orleans, LA

Jackson Square, New Orleans, LA